Panomania

0

Some panoramas and 360s taken around Boulder, the continental divide, RMNP in August:










Frosty morning

Weather station setup

Photo by Kevin Moloney, New York Times

Photo by Kevin Moloney, New York Times

This is documented here, so that others may learn from my mistakes. I use wview software running on a Raspberry Pi (RPi). My setup is not the cheapest, but over multiple iterations I have tuned the components to reach the current setup. The total materials in my setup (not including temporary parts and mounting which will vary, will run ~$550 (today).

These are the components of my weather station setup at home, and how to put these components together to build a weather station that uploads data to CWOP, WeatherForYou and Weather Underground, among other places:

  • Raspberry Pi – $35 – Newark
  • Power supply for Raspberry Pi – $2.45 – eBay
  • Case for Raspberry Pi – $5.99 – eBay
  • 8GB SDHC Class 10 Transcend flash – $8.63 – Amazon
  • Davis Wireless Vantage Pro 2 – $387.63 – Provantage
  • Davis Weatherlink for Vantage Pro USB – $114.95 – Provantage  [IMHO a ripoff]
  • Instructions – google “wview raspberry pi” should get you to a well-written raspberry pi wview setup doc.

You’ll also need a pole, mounting hardware or tripod depending on where you want to mount the weather station.
You’ll need an HDMI-equipped monitor or TV to setup the RPi, as well as a USB keyboard with extra USB mouse port (chained) as the RPi only has two USBs. The RPi will need to be hooked up via Ethernet to the internet unless you want to buy one of the wireless adapters too. You’ll need to get an ID from CWOP if you want to publish your data to NOAA, as well as one from WeatherForYou and Weather Underground if you want to publish there too. After you’ve mounted the weather station and sent some data, you’ll need to submit photos of the installation to CWOP. (more…)

Using IPv6 with a router

This is my running log of trying to enable IPv6 at home using a router that is NOT built into my modem. Hopefully this will be successful in short order, and therefore useful to the internet at large.

I currently am set up with a Cisco RV042v3 DUAL WAN router connecting to a CenturyLink/Qwest Q1000 ActionTec VDSL2 modem/router in “transparent bridging” mode.

Disconnecting the RV042, and setting the Q1000 up as a primary router produce positive results on the following three test sites (http://test-ipv6.com, http://ismyipv6working.com, ipv6.google.com) when the router is configured as on this site. This is using a technique called 6rd which is different from 6to4 and 6in4.

So the question is how to configure the RV042 to do this when the modem is in transparent bridging mode. So far, no joy. 5+ hours on the phone with a pleasant Mr. Perez from Cisco support, along with joint conference calls with CenturyLink tech support have not yielded any fruit.

I have signed up for tunnels at SIXXS and Hurricane Electric. I have purchased a VDSL2 modem that does not appear to have routing functionality (not yet arrived as of 10/10/12).

I will continue to update this post as tickets are still open with Cisco and CenturyLink.

Connecting to Amazon EC2 from Terminal on a Mac

Figured I’d write this one out, because I couldn’t find this documented anywhere else. You do NOT need to open a connection FIRST to your local machine, and THEN to Amazon, as I’d been doing:

dkabal-macbookpro:~ dkabal$ ssh -i ~/[pem file location].pem ec2-user@[hostname]

You can open a connection directly to the remote server:

  1. Copy the .pem file to the ~/.ssh/ directory. Make sure permissions are right:
    chmod 700 ~/.ssh/[pem file name].pem
  2. Then add the following lines to your ~/.ssh/config:
    HOST [hostname, * works if you use the same .pem file for multiple hosts]
    IdentityFile "~/.ssh/[pem file name].pem"

Stolen unabashedly from here.

Going to the internet for TV

So a friend suggested I document my approach to going to a fully legal, download/streaming solution for all my TV and movie watching.

A little background: I have recently moved from a dual internet connection (CenturyLink 7 Mbit/s ADSL2+, Comcast 2 Mbit/s cable modem, bonded with a RV082 router) to a single 40 Mbit/s VDSL2 connection, because of some compelling pricing arguments (the cable price jumped from $15/month to $40/month). With this, I feel compelled to use this pipe for TV viewing, rather than pay separately for TV and internet. So the total cost of the solution or solutions must be less than the cost of internet and TV.

So here’s the shows my wife and I watch:

The Walking Dead, Dexter, Weeds, The Mentalist, Lie to Me, The Big Bang Theory, Eureka, Breaking Bad, True Blood, The Daily Show, House, The Big C, Community, Parks & Recreation, The Closer, Rizzoli & Isles, Nurse Jackie, Entourage, Curb Your Enthusiasm

Here’s the solutions I’m looking at:

Amazon, Netflix, Hulu Plus, Vudu, AppleTV, GoogleTV

From the start, it’s clear I have an uphill battle ahead of me. The problem is that the majority of these shows, especially the ones I really like are on HBO and SHOWTIME, networks who have notoriously stayed off the internet.

This post will fill out as I evaluate my options…

PHP 5.3 connecting to remote MySQL database

So there are many solutions out there discussing solutions to the error in PHP 5.3 while connecting using the built-in mysql library to a MySQL server:

mysqlnd cannot connect to mysql 4.1+ using the old insecure authentication. please use an administration tool to reset your password with the command set password = password('your_existing_password').

Unfortunately, none of these solutions seem to work on a remote MySQL server. I have WebFaction running my MySQL server, so it’s impossible to configure the old_passwords in a my.conf file. What you have to do instead is:

SET SESSION old_passwords=0;
SET PASSWORD=PASSWORD('existing password');

This should reset the password to the 41 byte hash compatible with mysqlnd in PHP 5.3.

Free of Bluehost at last

So this post has been a long time coming (almost 2 years), mainly due to my own lack of motivation and the sheer amount of work necessary to move a bunch of websites between hosts.

After trialling WebFaction for almost 1.5 years, and finding them to be reasonable and responsive, I have now moved this blog from BlueHost to WebFaction. Many folks have written about how bad BlueHost is, and so with this blog (finally) safely off of that host, I now feel free to add my $0.02.

Winning runs from Sunday’s Rally Cross

So Sunday Cassie and I went out to Fountain, CO for Event #6 of the Colorado Rally Cross season. I won, but barely. I videoed all 12 runs that Cassie and I did using my iPhone 4 with a homemade mount (lots of double-sided tape and taped ports to keep the dust out). I think the footage came out pretty good. Our car, a 2002 Jetta with recently replaced engine and transmission mounts (old ones kept breaking) sprung a coolant leak, so we were filling the coolant with water every run, and it redlined on temperature every run (260° F). By the end of the day, we managed all 12 runs thanks to everybody who let us maximally separate the runs, and Eric Genack‘s supplied water (used 2 gallons). The coolant was clear instead of red by the end of day (completely diluted).

Must-see movie

Go to Top